Upgrade cascade : iPhone, Yosemite, iPhoto, iMovie

I’ve noticed a consistent trend of my colleagues and I, Computer Sciences / Engineering faculty, being way less eager than the general public in updating to the latest hardware or software. There is, maybe, a component of the shoemaker’s son going barefoot, but most importantly — I suspect — it’s the knowledge on sausage-making impairing our appetites. When you know the reality of system design intimately, you become very reluctant in disturbing whatever metastability you might have reached.

But all systems have a service life, and eventually even the most reluctant user will be forced to upgrade. After skipping 2 generations, I thought it was time to abandon my iPhone 4S for a new iPhone 6.

(Which was an adventure in itself : amazingly, after almost 2 months, there are still queues for buying an iPhone on the States. So far, ok — supply and demand, etc. — but for some unfathomable reason, Apple has instructed their clerks to outright lie about the non-contract T-Mobile iPhone, in saying that it is not unlocked.  After some googling and whatsapping with friends, the truth emerged : it is unlocked. Still, at the first Apple Store I tried, the clerks where very non-cooperative, and one of them positively adversarial, like he’d rather not sell anything to me. I am really not the type of person to buy into this “privilege to be a customer” attitude, so I just went to another store. Long story short : two days and 830 bucks later, I had an iPhone 6 in my pocket. It is indeed unlocked, I had it working with my Vivo telecom nano-SIM immediately, still inside the store.)

But as often it happens, one upgrade leads to another in cascade effect : the iPhone rejected my old iTunes, forcing me to upgrade old faithful Mountain Lion to Yosemite.

Update Unavailable with This Apple IDAs if to confirm that upgrading is a messy business, Yosemite got me a great welcoming surprise : it disabled my old iPhoto (“incompatible with new OS version, must be updated”), and made it impossible for me to update it (“Update Unavailable with This Apple ID”). For some strange reason, the App Store utility insisted on that message, no matter which Apple ID I used (I only have two).

Apparently this is not a rare situation, and the causes and solutions are exasperatingly diverse. What solved the problem in my case, was closing the App Store, deleting iPhoto altogether (dragging the disabled application to the trash), opening the App Store again, and doing a fresh install. The procedure itself is not very painful, I concede : the annoyance is having to find out what exactly to do.

For upgrading iMovie, the solution was not so simple. It is not a mandatory upgrade (the Mountain Lion version still works with Yosemite), but since I had gone so far, I now wanted to go all the way. Deleting iMovie made available a fresh install on App Store… for 15 bucks. No good. I’ve tried, as some suggested by some users, reinstalling the original (from the Snow Leopard CDs in my case), but to no avail. In the end, I just moved the old Mountain Lion iMovie from the trash back to the Applications folder.

Curiously, XCode, which is normally a trouble-maker, updated without further ado.

Edit 19/11 : upgrading to Yosemite 10.10.1 solved the iMovie Apple ID issue. I’m guessing it would have solved the iPhoto issue as well. This is another golden rule of upgrading — never move to the version with a round number, always wait for the next minor patch.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s